• Occasional

    St Vincent de Paul Society Festival Mass – Diocese of Broken Bay

    “Jesus went through all the towns and villages, teaching in their synagogues, proclaiming the good news of the kingdom and healing every disease and sickness. When he saw the crowds, he had compassion on them, because they were harassed and helpless, like sheep without a shepherd. Then he said to his disciples, “The harvest is plentiful, but the workers are few. Ask the Lord of the harvest, therefore, to send out workers into his harvest field.” (Matt 9: 35-38) If we were to go around and ask, “Who stands out for you with leadership?” the responses might be interesting. Perhaps we would think of a great political leader, a great social reformer, a sporting hero.  Jesus, himself,…

  • Occasional

    Silver Anniversary of Ordination of Fr Shaju John and Fr Joy Kunnassery – 25th Sunday of Year C – Asquith

    For a long time, it has been the social rule in Australia that the topics of religion and politics are not to be raised in polite conversation.  In Australia, particularly, when religious leaders start talking about political or economic matters many of us start feeling uneasy, if not even embarrassed. We have concerns about naivety, or anxieties about appeals drawn from a sectarian past, or fears about ecclesiastical interference in affairs that are rightly independent of the structure of the Church. Even if the voice is allowed, often enough the statements are relegated to be ‘motherhood’ and quaint, and really without a great deal of consequence. However, I think the Word…

  • Occasional

    Graduation Homily: Loreto Normanhurst (20 September), Brigidine St Ives (23 September), Mater Maria Warriewood (24 September)

    In a remarkable little novel called “The Passion” by the feminist writer, Jeanette Winterson the main character Henri declares, “To love someone else enough to forget about yourself, even for one moment, is to be free.”  There is a part of us that can consider involvement in the life of another as a loss of freedom. Commitment certainly brings a responsibility that means I can no longer live life only in reference to myself.  However, Henri is saying that real freedom comes when we lose our self in love for someone else.  In the novel he goes on to say that “some say love enslaves, and passion is a demon, and many have…

  • Occasional

    Singles for Christ Ministry – Regional Annual Conference – Manly

    Today’s short gospel (Luke 8:1-3) speaks not only of the presence of women in the life of Jesus, but perhaps even more significantly also of the simple, ordinary ways by which Jesus is nurtured and by which he is cared. If this be true, we, ourselves, care for the life of Jesus in the simple ordinary tasks of our day.  Doing the ordinary in an extraordinary way. It is a theme that is central to the perspective of Pope Francis.  In an interview not long after his election, he remarked “I see the sanctity of God’s people, this daily sanctity. I see the holiness in the patience of the people of God:…

  • Occasional

    Liturgy of Inclusion and Care for annual Diocesan Safeguarding Month

    Unmistakably, ‘liberation’ is a central impetus of the ministry of Jesus and of the Gospel. At the very outset of his ministry – almost as a charter – Jesus announces that he has come to set prisoners free, to raise the downtrodden, to proclaim liberty to captives.   Against his Palestinian social background, accustomed to the economic usefulness of prisoners and of the presence of the ‘great unwashed’, Jesus’ enigmatic declaration might be interpreted as simply a grand scheme of emancipation, a dangerous aspiration of anarchy and subversion. However, it does not seem that Jesus equates liberation with simple emancipation; nor did he reduce liberation to lazy principles of freedom. For Jesus, liberation…

  • Occasional

    Homily at Opening and Blessing of La Consolacion Convent, Toukley – 28 August 2019

    There is a magic in every beginning, wrote the German philosopher Herman Hesse.[1] It is the magic of anticipation which lies at the heart of the experience of wonder. The future comes to greet us with expectation. As we gather today with our Augustinian Sisters Our Lady of Consolation who have now joined the mission of our Diocese, there is every sense of being at a new beginning. It is what provides our celebration today with an unmistakable joy – the joy that belongs to gratitude. We welcome them, and with them we savour all the potential of their presence and ministry. We have been looking forward to your presence…

  • Occasional

    Eucharist of CHA 2019 Governance Symposium – Manly, 26 August 2019

    To be given the liturgy of the day at a particular event such as this Conference, and to have its prescribed readings proclaimed, can represent both a challenge and a possibility. The Gospel proclaimed in today’s liturgy (Matthew 23: 13-22) is perhaps not quite the one that with the freedom of choice we might have selected for a Conference on healthcare. And yet in a curious way it does, in fact, address the matrix through which Catholic healthcare operates, the framework of mission to which we are committed and about which the Governance Symposium attends in such an era of change. In his strident attack in the Gospel, Jesus confronts…

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